What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

About

What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Lydia on May 17, 16:50:

Thank you, Ryan! Tony, It would be a lie because even if I were to die tomorrow with no immortal soul to experience anything later, even so the one single good thing I do today, the one moment I pick up a crying child and comfort her, the one discussion I have with a troubled friend which gives them some small relief - those acts will be permanently "what happened" in the course of the universe, having in themselves more being than mindless acts of reflex or mere acts of nature. I'vethought about that a ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Tony on May 17, 15:40:

Great post. One small correction, though: Reality clothes itself--that vast, meaningful, and ultimately powerful Reality that, at the last, will (for those who belong to the Lord, and hence are in touch with Reality) redeem all our losses. It will win because it must, because omnipotence and goodness are ultimately linked in some mysterious way that the Thomists claim to understand (and maybe they're right) and that I don't claim to understand. Being a Thomist, though not a very good one, I would sugge ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Ryan D. Cobb on May 17, 07:08:

Lydia, Thanks for posting this. The forces of hell do seem ascendant. Perelandra is a beautiful book. I’ve only read it once or twice but its striking passages stay with you. A favorite of mine is a chapter or so before the passage you quote. Weston, after total possession by the demon, has been given a respite and is in apparent control of himself. He outlines the philosophy that you mentioned being zapped into Ransom’s mind. Human existence is like the earth, only with time instead of distance; all ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Cameron on May 15, 19:21:

Christopher's video would seem to vindicate the idea that the mask is essentially a talisman. ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Lydia on May 15, 10:06:

Good post, Paul, and it is an interesting phenomenon. What podcasters also do is to have sometimes a video version of the long-form discussions and also a podcast version. I've done many of these as interviews and/or presentations followed by Q & A in promoting my books, dicussing apologetics, etc. Tim and I just did one the other day with Pat Flynn, who combines physical fitness and apologetics on his podcast and his Youtube channel. It was two hours long. We had to take a break in the middle for our own s ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Tony on May 13, 10:44:

Since I no longer commute, I have been faced with no blocks of time large enough to consider working through longish podcasts. And with hearing loss, I usually miss just enough of the words, when I don't have facial expressions and lips to read, that podcasts without video are (to me) less than adequate. Furthermore, I agree GENERALLY with Paul that there is a perfectly satisfactory sort of trade-off between the speed of reading, versus the depth of expressiveness from the spoken voice. But in one conte ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Ryan on May 11, 17:29:

I'm really loving Parker Settecase's podcast too! In-depth interviews with Christian philosophers and others. ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on May 8, 15:58:

Oh, wow, Christopher, that video is...interesting. ... [More]

The Mirror or the Mask is now fully available!

Comment posted by Lydia on May 8, 15:55:

By Jove, you appear to be right. It looks like it is found in the paper version as well. My apologies. If we have an opportunity to do another edition, we will fix it! Thanks for the heads up! ... [More]

The Mirror or the Mask is now fully available!

Comment posted by Clark Coleman on May 6, 20:54:

Enjoying the Kindle version of the book. In Chapter VII, the sections seem to be numbered 1-2-3-5-6 etc. with no section 4. Is this a typo or formatting problem unique to the Kindle version? Looking forward to buying the printed edition of the undesigned coincidences book after I finish this Kindle book. ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Christopher McCartney on Apr 29, 17:30:

"Do they really think the virus is free-floating in the air?" That bizarre fear has been deliberately promoted by, at least, the state of North Carolina. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJFZDIIpTGg ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Apr 26, 07:31:

It amazes me that I still see people driving in cars by themselves with their masks on, hiking alone in a nearby state park with their masks on, walking their dogs by themselves with their masks on. Do they really think the virus is free-floating in the air? I simply don't get it and never have. Just last week I was in a local store where some millennial blowhard was pontificating about how great it was to see all the employees wearing masks, because earlier that same day he was in another store where the ... [More]

The racial Hatfields and McCoys

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 21, 14:21:

I have this queasy feeling of horror over the palpable, corporate relief we are all feeling that we didn't have mass rioting yesterday, due to the Chauvin verdict. If the expected destruction had been anticipated from ISIS, we would have been calling it (rightly) terrorism and would rightly have been arresting people conspiring to carry it out. As it was, I guess people in the Twin Cities and other cities were just supposed to brace for it and treat it as the new normal. This comment says *nothing* agains ... [More]

The racial Hatfields and McCoys

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 18, 18:41:

I spent many, many hours this past year trying to read up on, and sort out, the claims and arguments back and forth over this stuff. Some of it was in response to an impassioned email by a local white mother raising 2 adopted black children (with white children), impassioned in calling for some sort of intelligent stance or response among her (mostly) conservative peers around her to the issues being talked about by BLM. Some of it relating to other incidents with other people I know. Ultimately I have c ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 18, 16:26:

and we are using incarnate means (including facial expressions) to communicate important truths to one another. Something I saw recently drives this point home rather pointedly. I got pulled in to watching one of those ubiquitous videos where we get to "watch what happens when Soldier X comes home and greets his (pick one: wife, sweetheart, daughter) for the first time in 14 months". It has an invariate result: X and the spouse/sweetheart/daughter get caught into an embrace so strong they could probably ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 14, 14:26:

First, yes, I would. There are significant issues with mask wearing in terms of very important social and interpersonal values. By the way, this is *especially* true for children, who need the social cues of facial expressions. In church, especially, we are trying to encourage one another, we are trying to support one another in our struggles and trials, and we are using incarnate means (including facial expressions) to communicate important truths to one another. Having to be six feet apart is also inimica ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Gerry T. Neal on Apr 14, 08:43:

In response to Patrick's second question, I would answer by saying that in my opinion yes, there is good theological justification for abstaining from wearing a mask. Regardless of how effective or not those masks actually are at impeding the spread of viruses like SARS-Cov-2, they have a symbolic meaning. When you wear one you acknowledge the state's claims to ownership of your life and person. State mask-mandates dictate that you cannot earn your living by either opening your business or going to yo ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Patrick on Apr 14, 07:24:

Let’s assume that it would not be elderly people who are most affected by the Corona virus, but children. Let’s further assume that social distancing and wearing masks are effective means to prevent the spread of the virus. Would you in such a case praise Pastor Coates’s acts and condemn the measures taken by the government against his church? The members of Pastor Coates’s church not only refuse to engage in social distancing, but also refuse to wear masks. Is there a good theological justification for ab ... [More]

A gospel fictionalization theory is no help to the gospel

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 11, 19:53:

Thanks, Andrew, looks like the link to his audio resources that I had in mind in the o.p. has been moved here: https://apologetics315.com/2012/11/audio-resources-by-tim-mcgrew/ You can reach me even more reliably at my e-mail: lydiamcgrew[at]gmail[dot]com if needed. ... [More]

A gospel fictionalization theory is no help to the gospel

Comment posted by Andrew Boone on Apr 8, 18:18:

Lydia, the links to Tim's lectures aren't working for me. Is there an updated link? I want to add them to my YouTube queue. Thanks. ... [More]

Easter 2021

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 7, 10:59:

For I know that after His resurrection also He was still possessed of flesh, and I believe that He is so now. Bingo! One thing that happens sometimes is that folks who doubt the physicality of the resurrection will raise various questions to which Scripture doesn't see fit to provide answers, *as if* our inability to answer these questions definitively means that we have no real concept of the physicality of Jesus' resurrection. For example: Where was Jesus located in between appearances? Since he doesn' ... [More]

Eloi, Eloi, Lama Sabachthani

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 7, 10:53:

Thank you, Tony! As you probably know, some theologians have attempted to argue that at the time of Jesus' dereliction there really was a separation in the Trinity between Father and Son. But this, I think, is logically impossible, and St. Leo seems to agree. What I do wonder is what Jesus felt and thought at this moment. Some have argued that, since he is alluding to Psalm 22, and since Psalm 22 ends with the vindication of the speaker, he is not crying out in mental anguish but rather in triumph. But the ... [More]

Easter 2021

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 6, 09:57:

Yes, passages like this make it incontrovertible that the early martyrs not only believed in the physical resurrection, but explicitly tied their own faith to just that point, making it an essential piece of the mosaic of "the faith", a sine-qua-non of having faith to begin with. At the same time, they clearly believed in the physical resurrection in much the same fashion as they believed in the other parts of the accounts of Christ's life in the gospels (which they quoted from regularly): they didn't th ... [More]

Eloi, Eloi, Lama Sabachthani

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Apr 2, 22:22:

Very beautiful language conveying deep and ineffable truths. Thanks, Tony. I particularly liked this part: Finally, He Who underwent death is the same as He Who never ceased to be eternal, so that both facts are established by indubitable signs, namely, the truth of the humiliation in Christ and the truth of the majesty; because Divine power joined itself to human frailty to this end, that God, while making what was ours His, might at the same time make what was His ours. ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates' last letter from prison (hopefully)

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 24, 12:24:

Yes, I saw a vlog about that recently that was trying to say it's more complicated than that, but as far as I could tell the only "more complicated" part was that the judge had ordered him not to name his daughter anywhere, not to identify the doctors who are giving his daughter who-knows-what unspeakable "treatment" against his wishes, and (this is the really crazy part), not to identify HIMSELF in drawing attention to the case. And supposedly it was for violating these draconian gag orders that he was gag ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates' last letter from prison (hopefully)

Comment posted by DR84 on Mar 23, 12:31:

Thanks for the updates, this is such an important case that seems to have been largely forgetten. It will be interesting to see how Isabella declaring herself not part of the civil case will effect that case, if at all. I have no legal background, but I can imagine both sides trying to use it their advantage. One that says it is now clear that the deprivation of a relationship is much worse than just 10 years or so, and the other that will use it to say there was never any relationship anyway so nothing wa ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 19, 21:20:

Mactoul, you are right that sovereignty is not found in each individual, and asserting so is to assert anarchy. You may have noticed that I was laying out EXTREME positions, whereas I believe that the truth lies somewhere between those extremes. (Nevertheless, that extreme theory is, at least potentially, implicit in Lockean political theory, and the US is not the only purveyor of Lockean disorders). As Lydia says, the possibility of "vetoing" a bad or unpopular law is only feasible within limits, and ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 19, 09:16:

Actually, in my state, the people *cannot* veto the governor's illegal regulations "by legal means." We've tried. It isn't happening. To chalk up all civil disobedience to some kind of invidious "individualism" and to say that the only thing you can do is to find some way legally to overturn the bad diktats of the state is ridiculous. This is true even when the law is passed by actual "democratic means," such as if the legislature passes a law ruling that pastors must not counsel people in resisting sexual ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Mactoul on Mar 17, 05:41:

While "the people" are sovereign, no individual is. The proponents of "sovereign individual" dissent naturally --that variety of humankind being found only in US. Thus, the view that any individual "can in effect issue a "veto" of a really crappy law by an ad hoc "I will not" " is merely a surrender to anarchy. I see you do write "people" and not "individual" but the people can veto an unpopular law by legal means. At issue, is a possible misdiagnosis of the situation. What US is faced with is outright ab ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 11, 10:17:

That is sure one question, but it is hardly the only pertinent question. Further, in determining whether civil disobedience is forbidden, allowed, or even obligatory on a Christian cannot be decided apart from whether the rules in question are good or bad, and in what degree or in what way. but whether or not any government is at all entitled to take such measures I have myself raised just such points in the past, so I am entirely comfortable with this point in this context. In matters of regulatory ... [More]

Updates on Lisa Miller and Philip Zodhiates

Comment posted by Scott Waddell on Mar 10, 18:06:

By the way, it never ceases to amaze me how these harmless Christians who are unjustly imprisoned manage to find favor with the criminals with whom they are imprisoned. Probably because Christians are trained in manners and accidentally adhere to Michael Franzese's (mob boss turned Christian) Three Rules for Surviving prison: 1. Please 2. Excuse me. 3. Thank you. ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Patrick on Mar 10, 16:20:

The question is not whether or not this or that measure against the spread of Covid 19 taken by this or that government is appropriate, but whether or not any government is at all entitled to take such measures and, if it is, whether or not in light of Romans 13:1-7 civil disobedience is justified when one disagrees with the government concerning such measures. The criticism of this or that measure against the spread of Covid 19 may well be justified, just as the criticism of any other action taken by the g ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 10, 10:43:

This is part of our nature. Physical touch is so essential to developing young people that they can literally be damaged physiologically and psychologically by the lack of touch. When someone is going through a crisis, a hand on the arm, a hug, an arm on the shoulder, can be a very valuable component in the appropriate act of caring and love. Visual cues, taken more from the face (especially the mouth) than any other source, are an essential part of complete communication. This is one of the reasons why di ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Mar 9, 07:19:

Yes, and to take it even further, I've long thought that for liberals/progressives hypocrisy can scarcely exist. How can one really be a hypocrite if your "principles" are always adjustable on the fly? The libs are experts at calling out hypocrisy among conservatives, but you've obviously noticed that when the situation is reversed the liberals generally pay no attention whatsoever, and furthermore, you almost never hear them calling it out amongst themselves. It's as if to them hypocrisy is, and can only ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Mar 9, 07:01:

"It treats Christianity as a cerebral religion" I was thinking the same thing. No offense, but Patrick, your version of Christianity seems to be very much of the head, without much consideration for heart and soul, let alone the body. ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 9, 00:27:

you should refrain from avoidable behaviour that endangers his or her health and life. This ignores that both "danger" and "avoidable behavior" come in an infinite variety of types and degrees, and it is literally IMPOSSIBLE to live a life without having the effect of putting someone in danger by an "avoidable" action. The degree of danger matters enormously. The degree of necessity of THIS behavior may be low, but the degree of necessity of {this or some similar behavior} may be much higher, such as a ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 8, 13:13:

I think the ideological commitment and hence inconsistency is esp. evident when we get to things that are very similar if not identical to the things they are forbidding. Hence, some on the left will make a fuss about a church service being a "superspreader event" but be just fine with a BLM rally. Or a lawmaker making a fuss about not opening barbers or hair salons and then going to get her own hair done in one. There is definitely an idea there that, "These things allow for exceptions when the exception i ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Mar 8, 08:34:

Lydia -- I agree. My question about consistency was rhetorical. What I was implying is that there is an internal consistency to the thing, but it's not one that's readily apparent to the casual observer. To many on the outside it appears simply inconsistent (which of course on the face of it, makes perfect sense). My greater point is that it has long been a fool's game to try and hold liberals of this sort to consistency, as goalpost-shifting is part and parcel of the ideology. Even when they're operatin ... [More]

The disjunctions of risk in an old-fashioned world

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 6, 23:03:

The measures against churches are now literally proven not to be necessary to prevent a breakdown of "the health system." I say proven, a word I do not usually use, because history has shown it in passing. Even here in Michigan, hardly the freest state in terms of Covid restrictions, we have a full exception for houses of worship, with no limits on capacity other than the previous limits pre-Covid, no mask requirement for houses of worship, and no distancing requirement. Various churches are choosing volunt ... [More]

The Eye of the Beholder is now out!

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 6, 22:57:

My friends are getting copies before I am. I get 15 free author copies. I'm told they have been ordered. ... [More]