What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

The Same Old Weary Shuffling

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Jul 23, 04:29:

Wow. Where did you find this gem of a show, Jeff? Pacifica -- I liked The Pacific, but Band of Brothers was superior as those series go, in my opinion. ... [More]

The Same Old Weary Shuffling

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jul 21, 10:58:

I managed to catch a program comprised of colorized film of those battles, with narration, featuring an interview with Sledge's son, just last weekend. Gripping, harrowing stuff. ... [More]

The Same Old Weary Shuffling

Comment posted by Pacifica on Jul 18, 04:57:

One of the greatest war memoirs ever written in the English language. Right up there with U. S. Grant's personal memoirs, though of course Sledge was a lowly grunt rather than a general. Victor Davis Hanson has a good introduction to With the Old Breed on his website. It's also worth watching The Pacific which is based in part on Sledge's book as well as The Thin Red Line. ... [More]

Lisa Miller update

Comment posted by Lydia on Jul 15, 16:55:

I am beginning to fear that the job of "prison guard" generally attracts people who are not particularly kind. To put it mildly. For example, in an earlier incident where she was moved from one prison to another, all of her unanswered mail (including her attorney's phone number, wh. fortunately she had memorized) was lost because she was rushed out quickly and not allowed to collect it. At least that's how I understand the story. Callousness. Why should they research or know her story? As far as they can te ... [More]

Lisa Miller update

Comment posted by Tony on Jul 12, 18:18:

I have no doubt that some sort of guard nonsense like this does occur IN GENERAL, but it strikes me as highly implausible that guards would think like this in her case. Unless the guards are, themselves, lesbians, but...all of them?) The usual guard material is nothing like the attorneys that become prosecutors and the activist judges who sit in family court structuring utterly unreal "families" out of a frankenstien of parts. They may indeed like making life hard on REAL criminals, or even those perceiv ... [More]

Lisa Miller update

Comment posted by Cameron on Jul 8, 16:33:

Something tells me prison guards may actually enjoy making life more difficult for certain classes of prisoners. If the word is that Lisa Miller is "that homophobic chick who kidnapped a kid," then this medication withholding doesn't surprise me. Of course the surface-level justification will be some kind of red tape problem. ... [More]

Lisa Miller update

Comment posted by Lydia on Jul 8, 12:05:

And no bitterness. I sure would be bitter in her place. And btw, what's all this about federal prisons withholding medication for a known illness?? ... [More]

Lisa Miller update

Comment posted by Tony on Jul 8, 00:50:

That's one tough lady. It takes a lot of moral courage to do what she is doing. ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Lydia on Jul 3, 20:42:

The moment they say or do anything suggestive of heresy, their social credit score will be dinged, and they will be confronted with, umm, diminished life opportunities until such time as they perform the requisite penances. Sorry, I have been somewhat ill and not paying attention but just saw this. I would add to this in case anyone sees it that it also hurts the social credit scores of your family and friends. So they are held hostage for your "good" behavior. Just this past week Facebook has added a "wa ... [More]

(Guest Post) Was there a guard at Jesus’ tomb?

Comment posted by Clark Coleman on Jun 18, 20:38:

Mike Alter wrote: ' The sheer fact that people contest Matthean authorship (for example) doesn't mean that there isn't good evidence for Matthean authorship, NOR does the sheer fact that people believe Matthean authorship mean that there good evidence for that Matthean authorship. Proponents and detractors can only provide a list of “experts” support their respective view.' This is a shocking statement from a scholar, hence it is probably unintentional. No, proponents and detractors cannot "only" provide a ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 10, 15:27:

They want a Chinese-style social credit system, and it will apply to *everything*, including sex, and including who you associate with, and who they associate with. If they can force the, uh, passports for the stabbies, that's the foundation, and the beginning of the Endgame. No joke. ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Tony on Jun 9, 17:51:

Oh, they'll have government in the bedroom too, no doubt about it. As the "consensual sex" standard expands its reach, proving consent will be key, and will (at least sometimes) hang on digital info picked up in the bedroom. What with Alexa and Google Assistant being always on and listening in, and people not thinking to turn these off, they will grab info that is either damning or exculpatory, and that will find its way into courtrooms, then who knows where. And since sex can happen practically anywhe ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jun 9, 08:03:

About ten years ago a friend of mine wrote a piece in which he lamented the fact that we seemed to be moving towards a state which combined "total freedom and total surveillance." As the spheres relating to personal freedom are ever-expanded the policing of those spheres must grow as well: you can do "whatever you want," but to ensure consent and freedom from harm you will be watched. I find it ironic that while liberals have long lamented the "government in the bedroom," it may turn out that eventually t ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 8, 15:32:

Tony, that is *precisely* what many of the technocrats ultimately envision. Some research universities of the first rank, and probably DARPA as well, are already researching implantable biosensors that will log and transmit real-time data about various physiological conditions. Add universal DNA sampling, no doubt carried out under some pretext or other, and we're off.... I believe that, with regard to certain things in life, only hard rules suffice: hard, clear, simple rules. 2020 taught two importan ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Tony on Jun 7, 20:40:

Jeff, must I think about it? I started getting sick to my stomach just starting to think about it. and the ability to financialize speculations on life outcomes Just off the cuff, I imagined the gov-corp monopoly monetizing the predictive value of (a) knowing your genetic code, (b) without letting YOU know any of the implications of your genetic code, and (c) molding "incentives" to push you into pathways they like better knowing that genetic code. And taking that one step further, forming generatio ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 7, 11:24:

Tony, Chinese subjects can always utilize VPNs to access more or less whatever they want, but they cannot effectively act upon whatever it is they learn that traduces state orthodoxy, owing the pervasiveness of the social credit system. The moment they say or do anything suggestive of heresy, their social credit score will be dinged, and they will be confronted with, umm, diminished life opportunities until such time as they perform the requisite penances. That is, of course, the type of system our elites ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Tony on Jun 5, 20:06:

I don't use any of the popular social media forms, so I have felt largely disconnected from the ins and outs of this mess you guys are pointing at. I know it has larger effects, rippling down outside of the forums of facebook, twitter, etc, (e.g. doxxing resulting in people losing their jobs). But that aside, I do obviously use email and frequent a few blog sites, and equally obviously those are at risk for content-policing as a twitter account, even if they are not YET under the gun. While I shudder a ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Mike T on Jun 4, 19:26:

You guys finally convinced this free marketer that there is such a thing as blatantly monopolistic behavior and that it is the enemy of the proper operation of the free market. At this point I think I would rather deal with someone saying, "Oh, so *now* Lydia gets it about monopolies" than with someone saying, "What? What? This is all just small potatoes." In one form or another, we're all in this boat. So humility and charity are the order of the day. Everyone on the center-right who has lived in the rea ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Mike T on Jun 4, 19:25:

You guys finally convinced this free marketer that there is such a thing as blatantly monopolistic behavior and that it is the enemy of the proper operation of the free market. At this point I think I would rather deal with someone saying, "Oh, so *now* Lydia gets it about monopolies" than with someone saying, "What? What? This is all just small potatoes." In one form or another, we're all in this boat. So humility and charity are the order of the day. Everyone on the center-right who has lived in the rea ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 4, 12:08:

I've grown rather tired of all of the performative, throat-clearing, virtue-signaling denunciations of this or that personality who has been deplatformed, engaged in before the speaker says something about freedom of speech or monopoly power. It's supercilious and patronizing, and concedes at least half of the argument to the censors, prigs, and authoritarians, who do what they do precisely because they don't actually have persuasive arguments against those whom they seek to silence. There is a crisis of ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Lydia on Jun 3, 10:11:

Eric Metaxas's radio Youtube channel has just been banned, I hear. Enter all the people on social media, including some conservatives,saying, "I don't like Metaxas anyway," "Metaxas is a nut," "Metaxas platformed this person who is a nut," etc. Which is not, not, not to the point. ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Cameron on Jun 3, 09:36:

Oh, we’re certainly not there YET. But, given enough decades and perhaps another crisis or two, it is a distinct possibility. Zuboff just got added to my reading list. ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jun 3, 07:30:

I don't think it's "de facto socialism." I think that what we have is a two-headed Leviathan in which, like something from anime, the two heads are merging into one monstrous head with two faces. As I heard someone at a conference say a number of years ago, we are moving towards what China is, but from the opposite direction. Zuboff's Age of Surveillance Capitalism should not be ignored here. ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Cameron on Jun 3, 02:19:

The “privatization of government” is just the phrase for it, Jeff. As a rhetorical strategy I sometimes call Socialism and Communism “Rule by the Rich.” The point is that they quite correctly recognize that the rich wield a great deal of power and often use it badly, but their solution to this problem is to simply give all the money to a small group of people called “the government”: in essence, to make new rich people and have them rule us. It never occurred to me when making this point that America (a ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 2, 17:54:

The plot to "fortify" the election was orders of magnitude more organized and comprehensive than anything of which the GOP - of which I am hardly a fan - has ever even been *accused* of, let alone has executed. In combination with the decision of a large part of the political apparatus to allow BLM and Antifa free rein, it is obvious that the US was subjected to a color revolution of the sort the State Department and various affiliated oligarchs and NGOs have fomented abroad. 2020 was not a mere contested ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jun 2, 07:47:

"the elites are fully networked in, through, and across all of the major institutions and sectors of society" The first political book I read after the 2016 election was Lasch's The Revolt of the Elites, and that has colored my thinking on the thing ever since. (I read it again last summer, thinking that maybe I had overestimated its prescience. I had not.) While I was neither a Trump nor a Biden supporter in 2020, the revelations that came out in Time this past February about how a large cross-party effo ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jun 1, 10:35:

Well, I'm not interested in crowing over anyone's change of mind, given that the past 18 months have compelled me to re-evaluate numerous previously held positions or tendencies, and none of these issues is at all minor or inconsequential. The Big Tech monopoly problem is precisely one of the de facto privatization of governance, because a) the elites are fully networked in, through, and across all of the major institutions and sectors of society, employing any given institution for purposes which could no ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Lydia on May 28, 19:54:

Right, I have actually thought of suggesting to some people in conversation that they go ahead and crow over my finally coming to understand better the concerns about monopolies. As a long-time advocate of the free market, I have always had an uneasy relationship with antitrust legislation. This I think is chiefly because the judgements involved are somewhat qualitative and don't have sharp cutoffs, and I prefer bright lines in the legislative arena. But congratulations to Facebook, Amazon, Youtube, and Goo ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on May 28, 11:58:

Also: the publisher/platform distinction functions as a motte and bailey for the techbros. Ideally, legislation would not only address the monopoly question, but compel them to function as pure platforms: the only speech that could be restricted would be that which violates the criminal law, eg., direct and imminent incitement to violence, child exploitation, etc. This would also have the salutary effect of establishing a certain social and psychological effect, telling the techbros and the armies of woke ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on May 28, 11:52:

I sympathize with your plight in re: utilizing Faceborg. I have not yet been sentenced to a stint in FB Jail, but I have had restrictions slapped on my account, and I have been subjected to various form of the soft shadow-banning that limit the reach of one's posts, even to friends who routinely comment and react. Many of my friends have been repeatedly 'jailed' for varying lengths of time. I have several friends who completely decamped for alternative platforms more respectful of the value of free speec ... [More]

Social media censorship, social control, and penalizing success

Comment posted by Sean on May 24, 22:56:

For all we know, you might already be punished. No need for a ban if no one or very few people can see your "harmful" posts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Requt9zXN04&ab_channel=ProjectVeritas It's only paranoia if you have no reason to believe they're out to get you. ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on May 19, 08:05:

I've been thinking a lot about the same thing recently, Lydia, and am starting to believe that the answer, if there is one that can be really "known," lies in the nature of creaturely freedom vis a vis God's sovereignty and the movement towards the Eschaton. In brief, I'm thinking that Zosima's answer to Ivan in The Brothers Karamazov, while perhaps incomplete, points in the right general direction. Unfortunately I've not found any theological/philosophical work(s) that expands upon that view. I've had a ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Lydia on May 17, 16:50:

Thank you, Ryan! Tony, It would be a lie because even if I were to die tomorrow with no immortal soul to experience anything later, even so the one single good thing I do today, the one moment I pick up a crying child and comfort her, the one discussion I have with a troubled friend which gives them some small relief - those acts will be permanently "what happened" in the course of the universe, having in themselves more being than mindless acts of reflex or mere acts of nature. I'vethought about that a ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Tony on May 17, 15:40:

Great post. One small correction, though: Reality clothes itself--that vast, meaningful, and ultimately powerful Reality that, at the last, will (for those who belong to the Lord, and hence are in touch with Reality) redeem all our losses. It will win because it must, because omnipotence and goodness are ultimately linked in some mysterious way that the Thomists claim to understand (and maybe they're right) and that I don't claim to understand. Being a Thomist, though not a very good one, I would sugge ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Ryan D. Cobb on May 17, 07:08:

Lydia, Thanks for posting this. The forces of hell do seem ascendant. Perelandra is a beautiful book. I’ve only read it once or twice but its striking passages stay with you. A favorite of mine is a chapter or so before the passage you quote. Weston, after total possession by the demon, has been given a respite and is in apparent control of himself. He outlines the philosophy that you mentioned being zapped into Ransom’s mind. Human existence is like the earth, only with time instead of distance; all ... [More]

The Small Vine: Life Over Death

Comment posted by Cameron on May 16, 13:40:

The vine growing through a spaceship image reminds me of a detail in my favourite painting of St. Stephen: he’s about to be martyred, but right above him you see a tree that’s managed to grow through the lifeless city walls. A good reminder that in the long run Satan always gets screwed: instead of stamping out the Christians the Romans converted, in no small part thanks to the witness of the martyrs. The painting is this one: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Martyrdom_of_St_Stephen_(Annibale_Carracci) ... [More]

Building the wall [Updated]

Comment posted by Cameron on May 15, 19:21:

Christopher's video would seem to vindicate the idea that the mask is essentially a talisman. ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Lydia on May 15, 10:06:

Good post, Paul, and it is an interesting phenomenon. What podcasters also do is to have sometimes a video version of the long-form discussions and also a podcast version. I've done many of these as interviews and/or presentations followed by Q & A in promoting my books, dicussing apologetics, etc. Tim and I just did one the other day with Pat Flynn, who combines physical fitness and apologetics on his podcast and his Youtube channel. It was two hours long. We had to take a break in the middle for our own s ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Tony on May 13, 10:44:

Since I no longer commute, I have been faced with no blocks of time large enough to consider working through longish podcasts. And with hearing loss, I usually miss just enough of the words, when I don't have facial expressions and lips to read, that podcasts without video are (to me) less than adequate. Furthermore, I agree GENERALLY with Paul that there is a perfectly satisfactory sort of trade-off between the speed of reading, versus the depth of expressiveness from the spoken voice. But in one conte ... [More]

La nouvelle radio

Comment posted by Ryan on May 11, 17:29:

I'm really loving Parker Settecase's podcast too! In-depth interviews with Christian philosophers and others. ... [More]