What’s Wrong with the World

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

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Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Dec 2, 20:18:

Misinformed? No, just observant. Martial law is not going to be imposed over whatever election irregularities occurred, but the damage to the nation caused by unelected bureaucrats asserting a right to override the elected branches on policy, and fabricating a ludicrous conspiracy theory to camouflage the assertion of this extraconstitutional claim, is, alas, all too real. As for Trump’s claims in 2016, they were merely staples of right wing discourse, as much as voter suppression is a staple of left w ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Step2 on Dec 2, 20:14:

Tony, Understand that Trump's lawyers are basically circus clowns. Rudy ended up having to make comical changes like a press briefing at Four Seasons Landscaping, across from the crematorium and next door to the adult bookstore, reportedly because one of his witnesses (who doesn't even live in that state) is a convicted sex offender and isn't allowed to be within a half mile of a school. That is the degree of scam and incompetence going on with this group. ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Step2 on Dec 2, 19:52:

Jeff aka Maximos, "When we win, we win; but when we lose, it's only because we were robbed" I suppose you could instead go with Trump's claim that when he won in 2016 he was robbed by millions of illegal votes, yet with all the vast resources of the federal government he sadly failed to find or prosecute any of them. The very stable genius is always the victim of fraud, never the instigator. Russiagate was a straight-up lie, orders of magnitude more damaging to the nation than anything Trump has done, or ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Tony on Dec 2, 19:46:

Step2, I have yet to see news reports indicating Trump's attorneys have sustained any of their claims. On that ground, I have not accorded Trump's claims my support or belief - he hasn't substantiated them, so they are just claims. That said: In Pennsylvania the Dominion machines tabulated more Trump votes in every county they were used in, but in Georgia they supposedly switched the Trump votes to Biden. I don't think that necessarily follows: what prevents there being different people involved in ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Dec 2, 11:02:

I'm not going to enter into discussions of the incidence and severity of various modalities of electoral fraud, except to note that it is radically implausible, given everything that is known about the parties, and especially the historical expertise of the Democrats in employing the very forms of fraud that are alleged of the 2020 election, that no significant fraud occurred. let alone that no fraud whatsoever occurred - and I have heard libs making the latter claim. As for what the ordinary, apolitical ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Dec 2, 07:35:

Step2: Sorry, but I do not understand your comment. ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Step2 on Dec 1, 16:14:

Tony and Cameron, I did not intend to suggest there was no voter fraud at all. Only that by the nature of the court cases and the drastic remedies sought the Trump campaign must prove widespread fraud which was enough to flip the election. Taken on their own terms most of the theories being alleged by the campaign or its supporters don't make much sense. In Pennsylvania the Dominion machines tabulated more Trump votes in every county they were used in, but in Georgia they supposedly switched the Trump vo ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Tony on Dec 1, 10:32:

One thing I would suggest is caution about how MUCH cheating goes on. I think everyone realizes there is likely to be some (hopefully small) amount of election cheating in lots and lots of elections. I think they hope that it is always a small amount that might sway very tight local elections - the ones where the total vote is maybe 5,000, and the difference winds up at less than 100 votes. It might not be so limited. My first awareness of election cheating was when I was a kid: my father was a Conser ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 30, 19:45:

The idea that it is impossible that there could have been any election fraud at all is about as ridiculous as the idea that Trump could not possibly have lost. A bit of sobering up is needed all around. Objectively speaking, no massive conspiracy is needed to pull off election fraud--the system seems quite vulnerable to it at a lot of different levels, so all that's really needed is a few individuals willing to lie in service of a "greater cause," which the modern world has in spades (and yes, on the rig ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Nov 30, 07:38:

~~Sure, the "look what you made me do" defense. When are Republicans ever going to take responsibility for their own "wacky theories" and spouting falsehoods?~~ I'm neither a Trump guy nor a Republican, but I find it very hard to take any of this seriously when it's patently obvious that the entire mainstream media-information complex was in the tank for the Dems, and has been for four years. This is not to say that DT won the election. But it does mean that that the supposedly "unbiased" messengers stee ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Step2 on Nov 29, 16:24:

A more reasonable pundit, business, and governing class who (being more reasonable) knew not to act like a bunch of partisan hacks, phobic madmen, economic idiots, or gibbering totalitarian tyrants might have been able to prevent at least to some extent the rise of wacky theories "on the right" by retaining a few shreds of public trust in the first place. Sure, the "look what you made me do" defense. When are Republicans ever going to take responsibility for their own "wacky theories" and spouting falseho ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 27, 23:14:

The fact that Johns Hopkins would deep-six the research, without casting any doubt on its integrity as research, purely on the grounds of how it was "being used," must strike any fair-minded observer as quite chilling. Ex-act-ly. I can't believe anyone (hinthint some of my Facebook acquaintances) needs that spelled out. We could spin out all day the ways that could screw up science. And will. ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Nov 27, 23:05:

The fact that Johns Hopkins would deep-six the research, without casting any doubt on its integrity as research, purely on the grounds of how it was "being used," must strike any fair-minded observer as quite chilling. Among other things, this decision has made it more difficult for interested people to dig into the research itself. (One obvious problem with it is that the research only includes statistics through August.) In any case, according to CDC calculations right now, excess deaths since February 1 ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 27, 18:50:

P.S. Watch for your Health Officer to change her views on schoolchildren masking in 3...2...1 under pressure. Oh yes, don't get me wrong, the woman is far from reasonable. She has just recently issued a decree in which bars, restaurants, and gyms all remain open, but you can't have anyone over to your house (but "grandparents may still provide childcare"), and you can't have any religious gatherings, get this, of any size. Most ridiculously, AA meetings are still a-okay, and guess where most of those take ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 27, 17:23:

And Johns Hopkins deleted the above study from their site because it was "being used to support false and dangerous inaccuracies about the impact of the pandemic." What exactly these "false and dangerous inaccuracies are is anyone's guess. But the scientific research was extremely interesting and non-partisan. That, I guess, is why it had to be deleted. It was off-narrative. https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/matt-margolis/2020/11/27/johns-hopkins-study-saying-covid-19-has-relatively-no-effect-on-deaths ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 27, 15:49:

Another example of bizarrely heavy-handed content censorship by corporate entities: https://news.yahoo.com/alex-berenson-speaks-amazon-censors-015813560.html ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 27, 09:49:

Pretty much any study purporting to show that "masks work" could be subject to analysis and questions and potential problems raised from it, no less than for the Danish study. But Facebook would never do the same for those. The one-sidedness is absolutely obvious. Here's something really eyebrow-raising and interesting: https://archive.is/Dfq6H ... [More]

A blessed Thanksgiving

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Nov 26, 23:47:

May God grant us all strength today and in the coming months and years, both to do His will and to remain thankful for what we have. Well said. Happy Thanksgiving! ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Nov 26, 23:44:

I suppose some headlines reporting that Danish study erred slightly when they presented inconclusive results as "no benefit" for mask-wearing; but good heavens, what an astonishingly narrow distinction on which FB hangs its claim of misleading or false information. The way scientific "consensus" has been achieved, not by way of a lengthy aggregation of data, but rather by aggressive suppression of dissenting scientists, really has been chilling. Even without the active suppression of dissent, an incalcula ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 26, 21:07:

I wonder how much of that is driven by social media, search engines, news outlets' biases, etc. Hence the WHO calls for lockdowns and people want lockdowns, but when the WHO condemns lockdowns, that crowd still wants them. Facebook, Twitter, and Google as far as I can tell are pretty explicitly manipulating content in exactly this way. They are making it more difficult to find the story about the WHO condemning lockdowns. News outlets write headlines that are blatantly biased on these matters, etc. So peo ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 26, 20:01:

It seems that once people become deathly afraid of COVID, they become only capable of hearing "the science" that confirms or strengthens their fear, and deaf or forgetful of all of "the science" that tells them they need not worry--even when the fear-reducing science comes from the exact same source as the science that made them afraid. Hence the WHO calls for lockdowns and people want lockdowns, but when the WHO condemns lockdowns, that crowd still wants them. Another example from Canada: our Health Offi ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 26, 09:59:

Apropos of "the science." https://fee.org/articles/lockdowns-not-linked-with-lower-covid-death-rates-new-study-finds ... [More]

Witness and the crisis of the American Republic

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Nov 26, 09:39:

Yes, we have an illusion of freedom, but actual freedom is subverted by ever-increasing levels of surveillance. It's like the freedom inside a casino. You can walk around at will, play any game or machine you want, eat and drink whatever you desire, but you're always being watched, and there's only one way in and out. The only way to avoid the surveillance is to not go in in the first place. ... [More]

Witness and the crisis of the American Republic

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 25, 10:41:

And the funny thing is, NM, that the more we give in to infantile risk-aversion, the worse we make. In even a natural way, "he who would keep his life will lose it". The urge toward risk aversion will lead to give up all freedom to a tyrant, and then there is nothing to protect you from risks from the tyrant. ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 25, 10:34:

he apparently had no clearly Constitutional plan for deciding who had to go there The Constitution means exactly what he chooses it to mean, neither more nor less. The question is, who is to be master, that's all, said Humpty Dumpty. These all fits and starts are basically early trial runs for future planning purposes. ... [More]

Witness and the crisis of the American Republic

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Nov 25, 07:15:

"this contributes to a downward spiral from which there is no natural escape short of a crisis of hitting rock bottom." One of the things that contributes to this downward spiral is the societal emphasis on risk-aversion that results when life is valued more than truth. We'll trade freedom for "safety," even when such an exchange blatantly contradicts common sense, thus infantilizing ourselves in the process. (My governor, for instance, apparently thinks that viral transmission is affected by state line ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 24, 18:21:

And I know what will be said about it: "This is being taken out of context, because the CDC was only talking about humanitarian situations like refugee camps and such." Several problems with that: 1) So, you're a refugee family that has escaped from a tsunami and is now at the mercy of humanitarian workers in a refugee camp. Is it really so okay that they remove Grandma, who is already disoriented due to all that she's been through on top of her age, from the only familiar people she has left, to put her ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 24, 16:36:

Tony, Tony, not wanting to be isolated from your family is a CLEAR sign of dementia, so of course we must honour what these people would "really" choose if they were rational by dragging them away in chains. To honour their actual choices as opposed to the ones I imagine they would make would be to enslave them to their dementia. And you know, if they don't like living in our life-saving camps, well, we can always give them euthanasia to any who ask for it, or who we think would ask for it if they were fr ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 24, 00:25:

Well, because it isn't really coercive if we force you to do it for your own good, ya know. (Our superior understanding of your own good being determinative, naturally.) Force isn't "coercive" when it's us wielding the force. Besides, "may appear forced", but isn't REALLY forced. You just don't know how to correctly interpret the screams, sobbing, hands clenched on doorposts, etc. These are signs of people overjoyed at being sent to the gulag. ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 23, 16:09:

While we're talking about what might seem to be far-fetched theories, here (from this summer) is the CDC itself talking about "relocating" elderly people to "green zones" to isolate them from their families and from younger people. To protect them. No clear mention of how this will be accomplished and whether it will be forced, except for the following rather ominous quotation: "While the shielding approach is not meant to be coercive, it may appear forced or be misunderstood in humanitarian settings." ht ... [More]

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Comment posted by Sean on Nov 23, 09:25:

Gaslighting? What gaslighting? We never insinuated, with the 1619 Project, that 1619 was the real racist founding of America. Perish the thought. Nevermind what we published (and then silently changed), nevermind we used imagery of 1776 marked out with 1619 written above it on a certain person's Twitter account. You're imaging things. And you're racist. ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Nov 18, 07:29:

I think you see a similar thing on the macro level with the whole question of freedom of religion. The woke left is by-and-large much less religious than the public at large, which makes it difficult for them to relate to the latter's understanding of religious freedom. I've noted that every time I discuss religious freedom with a liberal or progressive, any pushback always comes from those who are themselves irreligious. Since they don't value religion itself, they are unable to see the value that other ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 17, 16:11:

At the risk of continuing the tangent, something in Lydia's comment strikes me: On the other hand, the right (or even responsibility) to hug Grandma *or* sing *or* gather in church *or* have a Christmas meal with more than ten people including people outside of your household *or* do sports *or* get within less than six feet of your friends *or* a whole bunch of other things that were part of normal, healthy life up to about ten minutes ago is *totally* negotiable These goods that lockdowns take away are ... [More]

Witness and the crisis of the American Republic

Comment posted by Cameron on Nov 16, 20:43:

A Roman Catholic priest in Wales just recently declared defiantly that he will not again deny his parishioners the Sacraments in the latest lockdown and that he repents of having done so the first time. Wow. That's not only courage, but humility too. God bless the man--he will need a lot of prayer to hold firm. It is a shame Zippy is not with us anymore--he would have had a field day with this thing. What is interesting is that I don't even see an effort to justify this tyranny on liberal grounds: I would ... [More]

Two little-known facts about organ transplant

Comment posted by Julia Kielczewski on Nov 13, 04:05:

This is nothing absurd, like some individuals seem to think. Ethical practises are always reviewed within Hospitals and Health Practice environments to meet certain requirements and adjustments, and to establish that decisions are ethically correct and sound. It is generally the heart which first ceases, then total brain death inevitably follows. It is established total brain death, which defines and determines if a Human or other living creature is in fact deceased in the Medical World. A heart in some i ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 12, 00:20:

like comfortable PMCs whose livelihoods are in no way affected by lockdowns sneering at small-businessmen who could lose absolutely everything under lockdowns. Or like low-wage earners living hand-to-mouth for a business that can be shut down - if they don't work, they don't eat. You can't tell these people to wait out a few months, or even a few weeks, that would amount to a death sentence. Much of this is absolutely about tribal groupings and allegiances, and it is reactive much more than it is affi ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Nov 11, 10:40:

Much of this is absolutely about tribal groupings and allegiances, and it is reactive much more than it is affirmative: it is less about - and seldom at all about, really - the positive claim that we, whatever group, believe X, and more about aversion, not even to the opposed position per se, but to the *people* who hold that position, who, as the inverse image of the group, have negative evaluations projected upon them. In other words, this is the pathos of class/cultural difference. In the case of the l ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 10, 17:17:

By the way, does anyone remember the AIDS epidemic and what the left's position was? I do: If you think that homosexuals should avoid risky sexual behavior in order to avoid catching a deadly STD, then you're a horrible, mean, victim-blaming bigot. And also, the deaths are all to be blamed not on the behavior of the people involved but rather on the Right, because if we cared enough we'd allocate so much money to research that we'd find a cure faster, faster, faster, and the right-controlled government didn ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 10, 14:35:

Tony, that explains part of it but not the combo with the reflexive Trump bashing. (I add that I, too, am no Trump fan--far from it.) I think that combo, noted by Nice Marmot, is explained by sheer tribalism. These folks move in certain groups. Those groups are supposed to be somewhat enlightened and genteel. They commend and affirm one another in certain sets of attitudes and beliefs, and those (these days) get set extremely swiftly into *groupings* of beliefs. Their tribe decides quickly, in a corporate s ... [More]

Defending Pope Francis from “Civil Unions”

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 10, 09:56:

NM, I don't have a definite explanation, but I think I have a clue: There is a group of Catholics who learned from their childhood a very high degree of devotion and loyalty to the papacy, connected intimately to the doctrine of infallibility but not limited to a respect for the pope's capacity to teach infallibly, more like a monarchy's subject's devotion to the king. So, those for whom ultramonanism is at least a nearby temptation, if not an actual condition. The existence of such Catholics is, proba ... [More]