What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Timothy Finlay on Oct 19, 00:22:

Tony, It suggests, at minimum, an author who is at least read in the common HISTORICAL literature of the day. I am fairly sure that there are no known authors earlier than Thucydides that used specifically 6 contemporaneous happenings to date an event. It is possible that Luke is giving a nod to a historian who gave a nod to Thucydides, but I don't know that this is more likely than that Luke tipped his stylistic hat to Thucydides directly. The Greek in Luke 3:1-2 (and also of the prologue in Luke 1:1-4) i ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 18, 16:38:

Tim, I seem to have seen the technique used in plenty of stuff besides Thucydides. At a time when there was no standard calendar or standard year between widely diverse nations, it stands to reason that if naming "X year of ruler 1" nails down the time for the benefit of all those who have ever had contact with THAT nation, then naming it against 6 different rulers will have the benefit of placing it for many more peoples, and do so in a way that further narrows it down to a smaller time frame than a 12-mo ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Timothy Finlay on Oct 18, 00:59:

The peace, which after the winning of Euboea was concluded for thirty years, lasted fourteen years. But in the fifteenth year, being the forty-eighth of the priesthood of Chrysis in Argos, Aenesias being then ephor at Sparta and Pythadorus, archon of Athens, having then two months of his government to come, in the sixth month after the battle at Potidaea and in the beginning of the spring, three hundred and odd Thebans led by Pythangelus the son of Phyleides and Diemporus the son of Onetoridas, Boeotian rul ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 17, 20:48:

That question is absolutely pertinent, Tony, and I intend to bring that out very forcefully in the forthcoming book. It is astonishing to see in one lecture that Michael Licona literally says that "Matthew would have been taught" from ancient rhetorical exercise books similar to Theon's Progymnasmata. Seriously? Matthew? One begins to think that perhaps "Matthew" in that case is a mere placeholder for, "Whoever wrote the Gospel." Burridge's Hellenistic bias and his utter, casual disregard of any of the pa ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 17, 20:39:

One might also have to beef up the arguments about who actually wrote the Gospels. If Matthew the Apostle wrote Matthew, then you would have the issue of whether Matthew ever even read any of the Greco-Roman bioi or anything else in classical literature. He was a tax collector in his former life, i.e. a numerate thug. No particular reason to expect he was a Greek scholar. Mark presumably spent much of his life as a disciple of Peter, in ministry; would he have obtained a classical education in there as ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Dan on Oct 16, 20:31:

Tragic news. May he be rewarded for his commitment to fighting the good fight. I stumbled across Zippy's blog a few years back and found it immediately arresting. This was something special. His demolition of liberalism is equal to the best I have come across. Many lament its worse manifestations, but very few were as precise in elucidating how it was a lie 'in principle'. Ditto with his work on the philosophy of 'consequentialism'. I also have specific interest in the topic of usury, and Zippy was perh ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 16, 17:18:

It's just supposed to be part of the "atmosphere of the time." His idea is that Lucian is generally part of showing the ancient atmosphere. Oddly, I noticed one footnote using the phrase "the era" for (literally) the entire period from Thucydides to Plutarch. That is not an era. It's quite a few hundred years. I don't myself mind using Julius Africanus (who was interpreting the Gospels and hence wrote after them) to illustrate that "ancient people" had the kinds of views of literal truth that Licona & co. ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Steve on Oct 16, 14:11:

I am sure, Lydia, you have addressed the issue I am bringing up in some other post, but I must ask: how does Licona's understanding of Lucian impact the gospel writers given that Lucian lived after the gospel writers (unless we go back to the 19th century dating of the New Testament gospels)? If the Gospels were finished in the first-century (or early second-century for a more progressive dating) but Lucian who lived in the mid-second century, how can this be used to determine how the Gospel writers "conne ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Steve on Oct 16, 13:58:

Likes: "Licona does not quote in his entire book a single one of the five separate passages from How to Write History that emphasize the importance of historical accuracy and truthfulness. This despite the fact that he refers six separate times (pp. 90, 110, 150, 185, 191, 196) to his own highly dubious interpretation of paragraph 55, about writing in a connected fashion." ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 13, 15:45:

I tend to think that he probably was okay with sometimes making up a speech, even though it *is* un-Lucian-like. The fact that it is unlike his other statements means (and this is how it's usually taken--rightly, I think) that speeches were put in a separate category. A weird kind of bifurcation. But in that case it's very important to know about and recognize that bifurcation so that it is not abused and used to "spread around" doubt to other parts of the work, to reportage generally, and to short sayings ... [More]

Let Ancient People Speak for Themselves: Round II

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 13, 13:33:

When it comes in your way to introduce a speech, the first requirement is that it should suit the character both of the speaker and of the occasion; the second is (once more) lucidity; but in these cases you have the counsel's right of showing your eloquence. Maybe I don't grasp the context of this well enough, but what is the import of the word "introduce" in regards to "introduce a speech"? Is Lucian saying that the historian narrator, in leading up to a speech given by a historical figure, is allowed t ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Scott W. on Oct 8, 12:13:

"I can't find this clip on YouTube" Here you go: https://youtu.be/poB8aIXI0Yo ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by The Masked Elephant on Oct 7, 22:50:

I can't find this clip on YouTube, but someone took a phone video of their TV screen when Ben Shapiro was on FOX News the other night and posted it to Twitter. Very refreshing. There's quite a buzz about it because this is apparently very gung-ho language even for FOX News, which is sad. But if this is the new face of FOX, all the better. https://twitter.com/LoveEmus/status/1049110078123642881 ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 7, 15:06:

I doubt that pro-lifers are backing off on the outrage because of fear of ratcheting up on the part of pro-aborts. I think pro-lifers back off on the rhetoric because of things like this: 1) They've been taught to talk about very early abortions, as if most abortions were occurring at an embryonic stage (which is untrue, as an empirical matter) at which the child does not "look like a baby," so they get all shy about calling it "baby killing." The pro-aborts, meanwhile, play a blatant bait and switch in wh ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by JACB on Oct 6, 19:09:

Hello, Rollory. I happen to be Zippy's brother, and when I read posts like yours above, it elicits a sense of deep pity in me. To be so wound up in your petty one-upmanship that you strike toward Zippy's integrity a short time after the hour of his death is far more demonstrative of your own twisted up panties than it is of anything to do with Zippy. I expect you are either very young and got so caught up in your own youthful (read: inexperienced and stupid) zeal that you simply lost sight of yourself and ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Joe Lightfoot on Oct 6, 16:55:

Well, there are no utter solutions, as Hitchens says. People are going to murder born children as well, even though it's illegal. But a legal regime with any claim to justice needs to make it illegal to murder children. I can say myself with great confidence that the illegality of abortion, where it exists, saves lives, just as (enforced) just law deters and punishes many other evil and violent acts. I believe that I myself would not be here if I'd been conceived post-Roe. Yet here I am! And fellow cranky ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Joe Lightfoot on Oct 6, 16:53:

Of course, the college campus vitriolic environment with feminists might create a new pathway there, what with their calling anything and everything "rape" if it has ANY effect on women that they don't like. Bad grades in physics class? That's Rape! They would probably equate support for adoption services for those who don't want to abort the child conceived in rape as "another rape" somehow or other. On that yardstick, though, being against abortion IS being pro-rape, but at that point "rape" loses all its ... [More]

Did the Gospel authors make composite discourses? It's complicated

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 6, 13:51:

Okay, so I wonder whether the many varieties of "holier than thou" groups land on Boghossian and crew for their lying to achieve their ends, like so many did on the Center for Medical Progress group for filming Planned Parenthood in the act of selling body parts? Admittedly, sending in an article and filming a sale transaction are not quite the same ball of wax. But ultimately the evil of which the Medical Progress group was accused of is lying - lying to get the footage. "The end doesn't justify the m ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 6, 13:41:

DR84, I really don't think so. For two reasons that I will offer. First, because the pro-abortion crowd already don't have any incentive to restrain from stigmatizing pro-life people, and using pejorative epithets when possible. In fact, they do use them quite regularly. It's not like they have another gear they can ratchet up the pressure with. Secondly, (at least with your specific example) trying to equate "pro-life" with "pro-rape" is not all that easy a sell, they have been trying for a LONG time ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by DR84 on Oct 6, 11:10:

Could some of the reluctance of pro-lifers to speak forcefully against abortion as baby murder be, in part, concerns that the baby murder advocates will be further incentivized to turn the tables and stigmatize pro life views? In particular, to further equate pro life with pro rape. That is a sentiment I saw recently in the Kavanuagh debacle, and one I expect will become even more prominent if there is a case that could overturn or heavily restrict Roe. ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 6, 09:31:

Well, there are no utter solutions, as Hitchens says. People are going to murder born children as well, even though it's illegal. But a legal regime with any claim to justice needs to make it illegal to murder children. I can say myself with great confidence that the illegality of abortion, where it exists, saves lives, just as (enforced) just law deters and punishes many other evil and violent acts. I believe that I myself would not be here if I'd been conceived post-Roe. Yet here I am! ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Joe Lightfoot on Oct 6, 01:43:

I like Peter Hitchens. He's the sort of guy who, even if you disagree with him, you can respect from whence he comes. You can do business with him. (I found his brother to be insufferable, and I'd even go so far to call his brother an intellectual fraud, at least in the religion department.) I disagree with PH's views on the drug war, but even then it is respectful disagreement. He calls 'em as he sees 'em. As I get older and older, my tolerance or ability to explain or rationalize away evil (including my ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Oct 5, 21:00:

Tony and Lydia's magnanimity exceeds my own. I'll put it this way: any comment even slightly impugning our dearly departed friend, in any capacity of his character, will be deleted. ... [More]

Peter Hitchens and the Glory of Outrage

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Oct 5, 20:27:

"insentient, unwanted, unborn" "First you dehumanize, then you kill." ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Lydia on Oct 5, 15:51:

Good heavens, Rollory, whoever you may be. (I'm not sure I want to know.) I'm the bluntest of the blunt; I've had a ton of run-ins with Zippy. I could say critical things if I thought it appropriate. But guess what? It isn't. This is not even solely a matter of de mortuis nihil nisi bonum, though actual traditionalists of many stripes rightly give more weight to such traditional (ahem), proverbial wisdom than to their own spleen and desire to have the last word. But it is also a matter of the essential t ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Oct 5, 07:07:

~~~Happily, "never strike first" is not a tenet held by TRUE traditionalists, because it is not a tenet that is prescribed by the natural law.~~~ Even so, what does "never strike first" have to do with the targeting of non-combatants in the first place? The two are not necessarily related. I never had much interaction with Zippy here but always appreciated his comments. God's peace on him and his family. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Bill Luse on Oct 5, 03:40:

It's the primary reason I stopped paying attention to him. Until you realized there was an opportunity to kick him while he's in his grave. --------------------- Tony: leftism employs consequentialism as its handmaid This is true. I once wrote something to the effect that leftism (modern liberalism) just is consequentialism. May not be entirely true, but seems close to the mark. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Tony on Oct 4, 21:28:

Rollo, your remarks are in ill taste. Whether Zippy was right or wrong about usury, its nature and its presence, his claims and arguments he put forth about it he held honestly. I, who among those here disputed most strenuously with him on his understanding of usury, would never stoop to calling him "dishonest" merely because I thought he erred on part of it. Besides the fact that he was, in the main, right about it, he was better read and more thoughtful about it than nearly anyone else around, and ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Semiotic Animal on Oct 4, 12:10:

Rollory, do you know the hell that is prepared for those who lie about and caluminate the just man? ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Rollory on Oct 4, 11:06:

"He was absolutely honest" At no point in any of his writings on usury did he ever address the very simple question: What is the value of time? The questions of time and value being so central to the concept(s) of usury and/or interest, the fact that he took such pains to see to it the matter never came up can only be seen as deliberate. This is not the behavior of an honest man - it's the behavior of a man who knows he doesn't have a good answer for an unavoidable question, but can't bring himself to ad ... [More]

Did the Gospel authors make composite discourses? It's complicated

Comment posted by Joe Lightfoot on Oct 3, 15:01:

Off-topic, but https://www.wsj.com/articles/fake-news-comes-to-academia-1538520950 More fake b.s. papers published. I note that the atheist Peter Boghossian is one of the heroes (i.e. perpetrators) of this hoax, and thus he has performed another badly-needed service showing the rot and decadence in soft-science academia. (Related off-topic side note: I've always wanted to write a hoax new-atheist-style anti-Christian polemic full of bad arguments, posturing, virtue-signalling, in a way that it would be ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by CJ on Oct 1, 07:28:

This is awful news and a terrible loss for online Christian dialogue. I will pray for his family. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Urban II on Sep 29, 05:09:

I had been reading Zippy for what has to be ten years, both here and his own blog. He never knew me, but I certainly knew him. I will miss checking his blog on a daily basis. God bless him and his family. RIP, Zippy Catholic. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Terry Morris on Sep 28, 19:05:

How could a person who kept his own identity so carefully hidden behind a deliberately self-deprecating nom de cyber exercise so much influence on those who came to know him at such great distances? I remember when he first started posting here as Zippy Catholic. I remember that my first thought was something along the lines of "what is a Zippy Catholic?," and "can this guy be serious?!" How ignorant and presumptuous of me. It weren't long before I had formed a whole new opinion of Zippy, and I truly belie ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Sep 28, 10:45:

While I did not know Zippy, personally, I respected him, greatly. He and I, independently, came up with a refutation of Sola Scriptura based on Godel’s Incompleteness Theorem (or, equivalently, Tarski’s Schematic T). I had always hoped to write a paper with him on it (although, that might have been a tough sell). I would like to have a Mass said for him. I am glad to find out that his first name is Mathew, because I don’t know how happy the priest would be offering a Mass for someone named Zippy Catholi ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Beth on Sep 28, 10:19:

I had no idea of this connection. I enjoyed Zippy's presence here and was always challenged by his arguments and his passion for truth. May his family and friends know the comfort and strength of the Lord as they mourn his loss, and the joy of knowing the loss is only for a time. ... [More]

Did the Gospel authors make composite discourses? It's complicated

Comment posted by Joe Lightfoot on Sep 21, 14:52:

I will never forget the time that I was in an e-mail exchange with a NT professor. He opined that Jesus was rejected only once at Nazareth and cleansed the Temple only once. In both of these cases I believed that there were two incidents. He said, "How often are you going to do that?" What an inane question, or, if meant in some rhetorical sense, what a lame attempt to keep you in your lane. In principle, we should respect the work of NT scholarship, even if we disagree with its conclusions. But this ass ... [More]

Did the Gospel authors make composite discourses? It's complicated

Comment posted by Lydia on Sep 20, 15:14:

and that Luke's account would have included the time/location/event information if it was in the resources he had. Or they might argue that Luke knew for a fact that the event occurred at some different time from the Sermon on the Mount but for some reason decided not to be more specific. One possible scenario that would not require a preference for Luke over Matthew is that Luke spoke to someone who said something like, "Yes, I've read that part of Matthew, and I wasn't there at the time, but I remember ... [More]

September 11th

Comment posted by Step2 on Sep 20, 07:41:

A 9/11 story that captures the tragedy in its most wrenching form. Not just the event itself, but the psychological aftermath as well. https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a48031/the-falling-man-tom-junod/ ... [More]

Did the Gospel authors make composite discourses? It's complicated

Comment posted by Tony on Sep 19, 15:14:

*Since* Luke is the one who doesn't give a context for it, it's considered *preferable* to think that the Gospel author who *does* give some kind of appearance of context for it (namely, Matthew) is the one who altered something rather than the author who appears even more unsure of the context. In other words, it's anti-simplicity. This preference for Luke over Matthew on this point could only make sense if the scholar already knew that Matthew could not possibly have access to resources that Luke did not ... [More]