What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Feb 24, 13:22:

I would be willing to make the case that the defining characteristic of our postmodernity is not 'the death of metanarratives', as Lyotard had it, but rather anarcho-tyranny. In fact, the latter is what causes the death of civilizational narratives. I also appreciate those observations on the epistemological and practical constraints on the maximization of safety, and not merely at an intellectual level. Last winter, I suffered two life-threatening health events, one prior to the imposition of lockdown ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 24, 10:58:

That under the current health regime it is thrown about with a notable amount of inconsistency should warn us that there's something decidedly sketchy about the thing. Before 2020 I hadn't fully realized this fascinating practical fact: Any safety first principle must be applied inconsistenly because a) human beings lack perfect knowledge of all the many possible outcomes of their actions and inactions and b) refusal to act often compromises safety. Therefore "safety first," even as applied only to matters ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Tony on Feb 24, 10:24:

NM, thanks for clarifying. I suppose that pointing at a specific astronomical event that we know happened is one facet of what I meant by "a shred of a detail as to one specific oddity", but what I mainly intended to refer to was a specific astrological conceptual model that was used at the time - even if only by "some" astrologers. Such as, for example, a "near" concurrence of Jupiter and Mars, less than 10 degrees but more than 5, gets interpreted differently than if their approach is closer than 5 degr ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Feb 24, 07:45:

"Yes, there might have been, but without even a shred of a detail as to one specific oddity it's mere speculation that would suggest it being applicable here." Tony, the book I read posited a specific astronomical event that astrologers of that period may have interpreted in the manner you describe. The idea is that God used this event to speak to certain Gentiles in the same way that the angel choir spoke to certain Jews. Thus the miracle would have been not so much the astronomical event itself, but the ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Feb 24, 07:26:

I have just finished reading Matthew Crawford's Why We Drive and would recommend it to all and sundry. While Crawford uses cars and driving as his stepping-off point, the book is really about modernity's descent into risk aversion and technocracy. He uses the idea of the self-driving car as a symbol for this transition. I'm also reminded of a statement by Augusto Del Noce to the effect that once a society starts prioritizing life over truth things do not go well. It's clear that by life he meant sheer bio ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Sean on Feb 23, 22:37:

Two things come to mind. One is people who say "this isn't real persecution, THIS (China, Russia, Muslim country) is persecution." are annoying. It's not just one thing. There's persecution outside of beheadings and being throw in prison for years on end. The other is what Lydia seems to allude to which is that there isn't just one thing to optimize for. Reducing covid deaths isn't the only good in the world. That odd single-mindedness that doesn't allow for balancing competing goods just baffles me. Unless ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 23, 20:47:

Behold: Owen Strachan doing a good job. https://www.reformandamin.org/articles1/christian-preaching-and-public-health?fbclid=IwAR270zYL5n5fQHPnko34pvM5TZxvoD6tg4uWQWZOpFLlB3zA0Dq0MDTVofU ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by John Evans on Feb 23, 17:00:

Hi All, Thank you for your thoughtful response, and I agree with you in your affirmation that the event seen above Jerusalem and Bethlehem was a supernatural rather than an astronomical event. Stars don’t generally “stand” over houses as we read in Matthew-2 or precede Magi out of the East. However, given how widespread the astronomical and astrological reading is in the minds of even many “conservative” Biblical voices, I too before diving deeper, once held entirely to a purely natural explanation. This ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 23, 12:47:

Anarcho-tyranny is a term that has often come to my mind in recent months. ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Feb 23, 10:48:

One of the most appalling developments of public policy, in a year filled to repletion with them, has been the conjunction of the following: on the one hand, the new breed of NGO-funded activist "prosecutors" who refuse to do the job of a prosecutor, along with the emptying of prisons due to both this ideological abolitionism (and I should note that I have long supported decriminalization of certain nonviolent drug and drug-related offenses, but that what we are now enduring goes far beyond this) and concer ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 22, 16:42:

What's particularly insane to me is the fact that there are so many other issues that can be described in entirely secular terms that are not being recognized. People avoiding routine healthcare for fear of Covid. Tuberculosis going undiagnosed. Superbug infection in a nursing home due to double PPE due to fear of Covid. Even "mental health" can be described as an issue that lefties used to realize. Some of the same people blaming sexual conservatives for the suicide of anyone who identifies as homosexual a ... [More]

We must obey God rather than men

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Feb 22, 15:47:

I have never been convinced that liberalism, of whatever confession, is a wholly coherent political ideology, but it is surely absurd for liberals to posture as defenders of pluralism, and then turn round and assert that *this one value* must trump all other values and value order-rankings, not only for *liberals*, but for all communities and confessions whatsoever. It is a real-life instantiation of certain types of arguments in philosophy, where a certain thing obtaining in one modal world is supposed to ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 21, 21:07:

I don't see why Luke couldn't have conversed with Mary in the 50s when Paul was in prison in Caesarea. In fact, that's probably when he conversed with Peter as well, as the journey to Jerusalem is not that far. We are all (including the authors of those "admittedly very late" traditions) about when she died. I see no reason at all why she could not have been alive and in Jerusalem in the latter half of the 50s. ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Tony on Feb 21, 19:09:

I respectfully submit that if it is highly unlikely that Luke got his account from the Virgin Mary, While Luke's early history (before traveling with Paul) is rather uncertain, it is fairly believed that he had been a Christian for some time, and it is widely believed that he had been at Jerusalem in the 30's. (Some hold that he may have even been one of the original 70 sent out by Jesus, but we need not put any stock in such a position.) I respectfully submit that any Christian who in the 30's spent a ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 21, 16:47:

Matthew is not offering an *interpretation* of anything, Vincent. Brown is badly off-base in suggesting that Matthew is making up a story based on some Old Testament passage. Matthew himself *certainly* intends his story to be historical. You may think he's wrong, you doubtless do, but that's a different matter from insinuating that he's just making stuff up. Your quotation from Bauckham is taken out of context. Bauckham goes on in that same article to take quite seriously the theory that Luke talked to me ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Vincent Torley on Feb 21, 12:38:

I'd like to refer readers to the following articles (all of which are available online), which provide an in-depth treatment of Ignatius' Starhymn, as it is known in scholastic circles: Brown, Charles Thomas, "The Gospel and Ignatius of Antioch" (1997). Dissertations. 3708 Khomych, Taras. "Conflicting Choreographies? Dance as Doctrinal Expression in Ignatius' Ephesians 19 and Acts of John 94-96." Mohr Siebeck; Tübingen 402 (2018), 217-229. Stander, H. F. "The Starhymn in the Epistle of Ignatius to the Ep ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 20, 13:47:

John is hoping to interact soon with these comments and is grateful for them. Due to visual impairment, he's going to be working with an assistant to post responses. ... [More]

(Guest Post) Was there a guard at Jesus’ tomb?

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 20, 13:41:

I very much doubt that that is an independent account (in the relevant sense), nor does it have the same claim to come to someone who knows what he's talking about. ... [More]

(Guest Post) Was there a guard at Jesus’ tomb?

Comment posted by John doe on Feb 19, 23:26:

Regarding the argument from silence, there is another account apart from the Gospel of Matthew which mentions about guards at Jesus's tomb. It's in the apocryphal Gospel of Peter. I'm surprised that it's not mentioned in the guest post. ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Tony on Feb 18, 10:04:

NM, while the hypothesis is possible, it runs into one rather obvious difficulty: in order for the astrological meaning of the astronomical event to represent something highly unusual - e.g. the birth of an otherwise unannounced king - it needs to have been something that is itself unusual in the heavens. It can't have been "Mars continues on its regular path around the heavens, per usual", because that would imply the birth of a new king (or some such mundane event) all the time. So, it STILL resolved do ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Feb 17, 06:45:

I remember reading something a number of years ago that argued that the "star" may have been just as much an astrological event as an astronomical one, given that in ancient times there was no strict separation between the two. In other words, it was a true astronomical event in which the Magi saw an astrological meaning. By interpreting the thing strictly astronomically we are projecting our scientific prejudice back upon ancient peoples who had no such prejudice. Unfortunately it's been ages since I rea ... [More]

Ignatius and the Star of Bethlehem (Guest post by John C. Evans)

Comment posted by Tony on Feb 16, 15:51:

I strongly welcome an approach to Matthew's account assuming at least the possibility and even likelihood of "the star" being a real event that was visible to others besides the 3 kings. I also welcome the consideration of the possibility that it was not only a real and widely visible event, but also that it was a true miracle, rather than a fortuitous concatenation of natural events (such as a particularly strong concurrence of planets), and as a miracle, we could not even potentially locate some natural ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 4, 18:27:

The 419 Fund just sent out an update e-mail stating that Isabella is still in Nicaragua and has issued the following statement: I, Isabella Ruth Miller, am grateful for the life that God has given me these past few years and rejoice in the blessings He has granted me. I am not willing to testify against Mama or anyone who has helped bless my life these past years. I am committed to continue to serve God in the days to come. ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on Feb 1, 20:26:

Yes, in theory, because they crossed state lines, and because the child was taken out of the country, this can be treated as a federal crime, but as far as I know there has never been another such case, especially with the pursuit and imprisonment of other people, including one who was an American citizen who helped her in another country. My memory may be off here, though I researched it carefully at one time, but my recollection is that Timo Miller assisted them only in Nicaragua yet was convicted of a cr ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Tony on Feb 1, 17:52:

In fact, I've had commentators on this very blog over the year defend what the judge did for that very reason! E.g. He's in charge, he has to have some kind of recourse if she won't do the custody arrangement that he insisted on. The court's in charge. Rule of law. Family courts have to have some kind of punishment with teeth for defiant parents. Lalalalala, I can't hear you. Etc. I have never heard of any other cases where the family court's judicial rulings and contempt decisions were supported with a de ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 31, 19:15:

The craziest thing about all this is how it looks like the Vermont judge gave Lisa’s ex custody in order to punish her for no longer being homosexual. I'd say more it was to punish her for fleeing to Virginia and defying the visitation orders. What I've found pretty consistently is that administrative judges such as family law judges, probate judges, etc., get very punitive when anyone defies their orders or their power or questions them. Lisa had stopped allowing Isabella to visit Jenkins at all. She had ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Rachael on Jan 31, 17:04:

The craziest thing about all this is how it looks like the Vermont judge gave Lisa’s ex custody in order to punish her for no longer being homosexual. Does anyone think if Lisa had left her for another woman that the judge would have cared to give her daughter to a virtual stranger? This is a worrying president for those of us who no longer suffer from same sex attraction or gender dysphoria and are happy in our new lives in Christ. It makes it much harder if magistrates seek to punish us for violating thei ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Scott W. on Jan 31, 16:14:

It's interesting to wonder why the recent enthusiasm by the Nicaraguan authorities. This is a just a wild guess on my part. I'm a bit of a geek for history of the Colombian civil war after Escobar. Today, was just doing a search of Colombian news items and stumbled on a story where close to a hundred "human-rights activists" were turning up murdered in Colombia. I put that in scare quotes because in the comments several people suggested that these aren't human-rights activists, but LGBT agitators, which th ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 31, 15:32:

But the question remains: since men (according to the account) also went and checked out the empty tomb, what does it matter whether women first discovered it? If women are unreliable, then rely on the men. It's not like the women SAW the tomb becoming empty, i.e. saw Christ coming out of it for the first time. Their witnessing it empty is not privileged compared to the men witnessing it empty, they BOTH saw it empty. So, the account is not relying on women alone for the claim that the tomb was seen e ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 31, 14:58:

Scott, I think you are thinking of the Peter Vadala firing from a Brookstone store in Massachusetts. Coincidentally around the same time as Lisa fled. https://www.foxnews.com/story/massachusetts-man-says-he-was-fired-for-telling-colleague-her-gay-marriage-is-wrong http://www.whatswrongwiththeworld.net/2009/11/speak_now_or_forever_hold_your.html I have little doubt that in their time in Nicaragua, they were hidden by God's pinions as the psalm says, but naturally I'd be curious about any practical pointer ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Scott W. on Jan 31, 14:40:

Thanks so much for the update. It was the early '00s (I *think*, I can't find it on the net) when an employee was fired from Brooks Brothers after being cajoled by his manager for his views on same-sex marriage which she (and Brooks Brothers bigwigs) deemed unacceptable. I discerned then that this is from where the spearhead of a new wave of assaults on Christians was going to come. The Lisa-Isabella Miller case was to my mind one of the sharpest manifestations of this. A sign of the ascendancy of what Bri ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 31, 13:14:

But the account was written in that earlier culture, and (arguably) no such writer could possibly forecast later cultures breaking down the bias. To me this looks distinctly like an anachronistic ploy. I myself do sometimes talk about the criterion of embarrassment, because we're supposed to envisage (hypothetically) a person sitting around and making up a story, and we could say that such a person's mind, in the cultural context, would naturally move toward having men first discover the tomb. The idea bei ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 31, 00:21:

This is the idea that the empty tomb stories have women first discovering the empty tomb. Women, being looked down on in the original culture, would (goes the argument) be especially unlikely to be invented as the original witnesses to the empty tomb if those stories were *completely* made up. First of all, it DEPENDS on the fact that in that culture, women were considered to be unreliable witnesses, and that general observers of the time (even those unbiased about Christian claims) would have hemmed and h ... [More]

Philip Zodhiates is still in prison [Updated]

Comment posted by Beth Impson on Jan 30, 18:31:

Thanks for this update, Lydia. A horrific situation indeed. ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 29, 17:30:

Sorry, here's the video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrXVbvGGmZQ ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 29, 17:28:

Tony, good question: In evangelical scholarship and apologetics at least they generally push on what is called the "criterion of embarrassment" to argue for the empty tomb, plus a big fanfare to the effect (which is really not quite true) that Paul "attests" to the empty tomb in I Cor. 15. At most, Paul implies it very indirectly. In fact, he says nothing explicit about it there and would have heard about it only from the apostles or women, who are also the sources for the tomb discovery accounts in the ... [More]

Pain is the price of patriotism

Comment posted by Jeff Martin on Jan 29, 16:38:

Beer's essay is excellent, informed as it is by a recognition of our finitude, which entails *limits*, meaning that life is fundamentally tragic, structured by the inevitability of trade-offs. The view Beer is critiquing, the view of the technocrats and lockdowners, formally denies the limited and tragic nature of life, and imagines that by means of quantification - the expression of the Promethean drive for mastery - we can wrest control of life from Nature and Fate. Substantively, though, it cannot esca ... [More]

Pain is the price of patriotism

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 29, 06:42:

https://www.frontporchrepublic.com/2021/01/limits-risk-aversion-and-technocracy/ Limits, Risk Aversion, and Technocracy Outstanding essay recently posted at FPR. The Laschian critique of capitalism may cause a certain amount of bristling among some, but the main points that the author makes are in my view very important. ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 29, 00:35:

Is there *some* indirect evidence for the empty tomb from things like, "The opponents of Christianity would have displayed the body otherwise" and the like? Sure, there is some. But when you throw the Gospel accounts under the bus as much as Licona & co. do, it's not all *that* strong. Maybe, on that basis, the tomb was empty because otherwise the counter-push would have been otherwise. I myself think that's probably the strongest argument in the absence of the Gospel accounts. Much stronger than the vague ... [More]

An irony of minimalism in defending the resurrection

Comment posted by Justin on Jan 28, 19:45:

Thanks for your patience. I see what you mean by bottleneck now. I thought there were a few different connections you could make from Paul to the apostles which avoided it but I agree now there's not much. ... [More]