What’s Wrong with the World

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

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November 2020 Archives

November 6, 2020

Witness and the crisis of the American Republic

Here (verbatim) is what I just posted on Facebook:

It is a surreal experience re-reading Whittaker Chambers's book Witness in 2020 while watching, by sign after sign, the loss of our free republic. Chambers, after his break with Communism, was a true and intense American patriot. Though a painfully shy and intensely private man, Chambers believed that it was God's purpose that he subject himself to ridicule, calumny, and hatred, not to mention the public exposure of his own sins, both personal and national, in an attempt to waken the nation from its complacent slumber and save the republic for future generations. Witness testifies to the overwhelming pain that his testimony in late 1948 and early 1949 cost him. When one knows more of the story, not mentioned in the book, one sees this even more clearly--namely, that Chambers had to confess in his testimony to having been bisexual during his time as a Communist spy and to having had homosexual trysts, which (he said) he completely turned away from after his religious conversion and break with Communism. This moral admission was ruthlessly used against him as part of a campaign to portray him as mentally unstable in order to discredit his testimony to the Communist conspiracy of which he had been a part.

All of this he endured, to the breaking point of pressure (he attempted suicide once during the case) and beyond, because of his love for our country and his desire that it should continue to exist in peace and freedom.

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November 21, 2020

Wackadoodle theories, the election, and the death of the republic

Herewith more scarcely-edited musings:

It should go without saying that election fraud is a bad thing and should be prosecuted, even if it doesn't change the result of the election. Suppose (which doesn't seem unreasonable) that the election fraud that has occurred this time around hasn't changed the outcome. Nonetheless, if it goes unprosecuted it may change the result in another year with a closer contest. Emboldened, bad actors will do even more.

The enablement by the media has been absolutely appalling and blatantly partisan. Bullying whistleblowers (such as the postal worker) and demonizing everyone who takes allegations seriously, together with an unspoken but all-too-real political double standard, sends a message.

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